Tomorrow, We Set Sail for Horta in the Azores

It has been a most pleasant five days in St. George’s.    The warmth of the Bermudians has been felt day after day.  Walking on the streets in the morning, almost every person says hello or good morning.  This was the case whether the individual was young or old, black or white, poor or elegantly dressed.

Today we shopped for groceries and were waiting for a cab.  After 20 minutes or so, a gentleman drove up and asked if we were waiting for a cab.  He noticed we had been waiting for long time.  He said he was headed to his boat in St. George’s.  He volunteered to drive us to St George’s.  We loaded 10 grocery bags in the back of his station wagon. He drove us to the dock where our boat was 100 yards away.   To transfer the bags to the boat we had to leave some by the curb.  A man noticed our predicament and volunteered to watch our bags.

There is a wonderful sense of comradely among the ARC Europe participants.  Invariably, something on the boat breaks during a challenging passage.  In our case the culprit was the bow thruster. While docking at St. George’s, the thruster got stuck on.  That meant the bow was moving without the helmsman being able to lift his finger and turn it off.  Roy shut the main engine off and it simultaneously shut the thruster down.  Crew members from at least four boats agreed to look at the problem.  The source of the problem was initially thought to be the switch at the helm.  Subsequent opinions converged on the solenoids at the bow above the thruster.  At the moment, we are waiting for a mechanic to return with the solenoids and news of the bench test.